One of the biggest challenges facing the new GNA is its ability to galvanize fragmented Libyan political factions and militias to participate in the fight against ISIS. As it stands now, this change of approach depends on the ability of the GNA to form a united Libyan team to create and lead locally accountable processes against ISIS, rather than just sitting back rather than just approving international airstrikes.

Even if the GNA makes a paper request for international support which would allow such airstrikes to bypassing parliamentary votes in western countries, the lack of local Libyan leadership of such processes may fuel a larger geo-political crisis inside the country. Equally, without local ownership and unity behind the GNA, those claiming rightful Jihad against a western imposed colonial government will be vindicated, providing all the ingredients for a potent mix of local ISIS terrorism, civil war and long term chaos in the country.